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COLLABORATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY

 

Advances in Teaching and Learning Technologies

The Advances in Teaching and Learning Technologies mini-track encourages research contributions that deal with learning theories, cognition, tools and their development, enabling platforms, communication media, distance learning, supporting infrastructures, user experiences, research methods, social impacts, and/or measurable outcomes as they relate to the area of technology and its support of improving teaching and learning. Appropriate usage environments range from same-time, same-place to anytime, anywhere that increase interactions among the learners and the teacher/facilitator. Special interest continues to focus on innovative ways of using social media to facilitate learning. In this respect, this mini-track is intended to include all aspects of teaching and learning technologies from the original inceptions of theories and tools through the measurement of learning outcomes.

Additional details and information may be found online at: http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/esantane/atlt.html

Eric L. Santanen is an Associate Professor and Co-Director of Bucknell University's School of Management. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and a M.S. and B.S. from NJIT. Eric's research interests focus on technologies that support collaboration in education, idea generation, and creative problem solving and been involved with HICSS since 1997.

David Spencer has a Ph.D. from NJIT and Rutgers University, a BSEE from CMU, and an MS from NJIT. His experience includes 25 years as a systems engineer and his research interests include computer-mediated communication, human-computer interaction, and group support systems. He is a member of the IEEE, ACM, and AIS.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

David H. Spencer (Primary Contact)
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Email: dspencer@njit.edu

Eric Santanen
Bucknell University
Email: esantane@bucknell.edu

 

 

COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVES ON COLLABORATION

In knowledge intensive collaborative tasks the main "production factor" is cognitive effort. Therefore the cognitive load involved in collaborative tasks will be a key determinant of productivity. Understanding cognitive load and cognitive activities involved in collaboration offers various design principles to efficiently and effectively use cognitive capacity. Cognitive load research has mainly focused on individual tasks. In order to design interventions that improve cognitive efficiency in collaborative tasks we need to understand cognitive patterns and activities in collaboration. This minitrack will aim to present papers and encourage discussion on this exciting new level of analysis.

Interests are in various perspectives on a cognitive understanding of collaboration and phenomena in collaboration. Such research could include cognitive load analysis, and cognitive explanations of phenomena such as motivation, productivity, commitment, (group) efficacy, trust, and shared understanding. Topics such as shared mental models, cognitive mapping and other group convergence phenomena from a cognitive perspective, as well as measurement approaches, would be welcome. Further, we encourage authors to reflect on the implications of their findings for the design and use of collaboration support technology and facilitation of collaboration.

This "Cognitive perspectives on Collaboration" minitrack focuses on:

  1. Cognitive load involved in collaborative tasks
  2. Understanding Cognitive effort involved in collaborative activities
  3. Cognitive perspectives on phenomena in collaboration such as motivation, productivity, commitment, (group) efficacy, trust, shared understanding, etc.
  4. Measurement of cognitive activity or neurologic effects explaining phenomena in collaboration

Shared mental models, sense making and convergence

Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten is an assistant Professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. She is an experienced facilitator of thinkLets-based Group Support Systems workshop having worked with numerous public and private organizations. Her research focuses on the quality of thinkLet-based collaboration process design for complex tasks. She developed the first example of Computer Supported Collaboration Engineering (CACE) technology: an integrated support suite to assist collaboration engineers in process design. She has organized successful minitracks and tutorials at HICSS for the past four years. Her research has been presented at HICSS, CRIWG, AMCIS, EE and GDN conferences and has been published in the Journal of Management Information Systems, International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Journal of the AIS, and Group Decision and Negotiation.

Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Mangement Information Systems in the College of Business Administration at San Diego State University, where he has served as a faculty member since 2000. He received his Ph.D. in Management Information Systems from the University of Arizona and his B.S. in Marketing from Truman State University. He served as a faculty member at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology in the Department of Information and Systems Management from 1996 to 1999 and at Trinity University in the Department of Business Administration from 1999 to 2000. His primary research interest is the development and evaluation of technologies and work practices to support decision making. He has published over forty refereed journal and conference articles on these topics and his work has appeared in the Journal of Management Information Systems, Communications of the ACM, and Decision Support Systems, among others.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten (Primary Contact)
Delft University of Technology
Email: g.l.kolfschoten@tudelft.nl

Bruce A. Reinig
San Diego State University
Email: breinig@mail.sdsu.edu

 

 

COLLABORATIVE MODELING

Modeling is a basic skill and practice in various disciplines, and requires complex analytical and conceptualization skills. Many modeling methods and techniques are used in business, engineering and research; they are often enablers for organized rational thinking and communication. Traditionally, models are mostly made by individuals. However, in an increasing number of situations modeling is becoming a group activity, involving mixed groups of participants and facilitators such as engineers, analysts, architects, and various types of stakeholders. Collaborative modeling (closely related to participative and interactive modeling) is a challenge because it requires groups to create rational conceptual structures of considerable complexity whilst also achieving a very sophisticated level of shared understanding, agreement, and commitment. Collaborative modeling is practiced in many domains, such as business process modeling, system dynamics, problem structuring methods, software, enterprise and organizational engineering, gaming, simulation, operations research., etc. This minitrack invites experiences and research focused on collaborative approaches to modeling.

This Collaborative Modeling minitrack focuses on:

  1. Modeling languages, visualizations and representations, procedures, games, facilitation, and patterns to support (a)synchronous collaborative or group modeling (facilitated or not) for co-located and distributed people, teams, or groups.
  2. The design, application, and evaluation of collaborative modeling methods, tools, and technologies.
  3. Experiences and strategies for deployment of collaborative modeling in organizations.
  4. Theoretical foundations of and practical approaches to collaborative modeling.

Stijn Hoppenbrouwers is an assistant professor at Radboud University Nijmegen (the Netherlands), Dept. of Model Based System Development of the Faculty of Science. He has published and lectured extensively on communication and conceptualization processes in system development, with a special interest in (collaborative) modeling, including gaming approaches to elicitation and modeling. His teaching includes requirements engineering and business rules specification. Stijn is a member of IFIP TG8.1 and in 2010 chaired the 3rd IFIP 8.1 Working Conference on the Practice of Enterprise Modeling (Delft, the Netherlands). He is a regular reviewer for numerous conferences and journals, and co-editor of a number of books. He participated in various national and international applied research projects, including the ArchiMate project (resulting in a widely adopted language for enterprise architecture modeling) and the (running) Agile Service Development project. For further information see www.cs.ru.nl/~stijnh.

Etinne Rouwette is an associate professor at Radboud University Nijmegen Methodology Department of the Faculty of Management Sciences. He lectures on empirical research methods and group decision support methods, including Electronic Meeting Systems, Problem Structuring Methods, gaming simulation and group model building. His research concentrates on effect of participating in the use of these methods on beliefs, attitudes and behavior. Etinne is a member of the System Dynamics Policy Council and was the local host for the 2006 International System Dynamics Conference. In 1996, 1999 and 2002 he was involved in organizing annual conferences for the International Association of Facilitators. His work has been presented at the ISDC and AOM. He published in System Dynamics Review, Group Decision and Negotiation, Journal of the Operational Research Society, Systems research and Behavioral Science.

Peter Rittgen is currently Full Professor at the School of Business and Informatics of the University of Boras, Sweden, and Associate Professor at the Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School. He has been doing research on business processes and information systems development since 1997, especially in the areas Business and IT Co-design & Collaborative Modeling, Business Network Governance and Business Process Simulation & Improvement. Peter is the Vice-Chair of the AIS Special Interest Group on Modeling and Simulation, SIGMAS (www.ModellingAndSimulation.org) and an Associate Editor of the Informing Science Journal. He is also a PC member in several international conferences and serves on numerous review committees for international journals and conferences. He published over 90 works including 2 edited books, 2 edited journal issues, 17 book chapters and 16 journal articles. For further details refer to http://www.adm.hb.se/~PRI/.

 

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Stijn Hoppenbrouwers (primary contact)
Radboud University Nijmegen
Email: stijnh@cs.ru.nl

Etinne Rouwette
Radboud University Nijmegen
Email: E.Rouwette@fm.ru.nl

Peter Rittgen
University of Boras

Email: peter.rittgen@hb.se

 

 

CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION IN TEAMS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Innovation is a critical force in organizational performance and survival. Changes in technology, globalization, and increased competition have all created an environment in which creativity and innovation are needed in order to cope with situational and economic pressures and frequent changes. Designers and Developers of organizational systems must therefore innovate almost continuously to keep the organization aligned with such changes. Creativity is a critical pre-condition for innovation. Generating novel and creative ideas are the key to innovation and growth in every organization today. Providing employees with tools to think creatively has been proven to increase innovation in organizations. Research shows that organizations which have established skill-bases and tools for creativity outperform the competition in terms of revenue, rolling out new products, innovation and growth. Though organizations deploy groups for most creative processes, there has been little research in the area of group creativity. Most creative research is focused on individual factors affecting creativity. Many challenges that arise from pursuing creativity in teams remain unexplored.

We seek papers to improve creativity and innovation through all phases of problem-solving: Understanding a problem, devising potential solutions, evaluating alternatives, making choices, making plans, taking action, and after-action review. We seek papers addressing creativity in all patterns of collaboration: Generating ideas, converging on those deemed worthy of more attention, organizing ideas, evaluating ideas, and building consensus. We also seek papers that suggest improvements for realizing creative ideas in the workforce as innovations, for an organization cannot benefit from its creativity until its ideas are implemented.

Thus, the "Creativity in Teams and Organizations" minitrack focuses on:

  1. Methods & techniques to improve creativity in co-located and distributed groups
  2. Systems and Technology for Enhancing Creativity
  3. Challenges and opportunities for creativity in teams
  4. Theoretical foundations for creativity at individual, group and organizational levels
  5. Practical approaches to foster creativity at individual, group and organizational levels
  6. The creation and implementation of innovations in organizations
  7. Factors affecting creativity in teams and organizations
  8. Building team-based organizations
  9. Creativity and innovation concepts, theories, and practices for product or service development.

Roni Reiter-Palmon is a Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where she is director of the Industrial/Organizational psychology program and research director of the Institute for Collaboration Science. She received her PhD from George Mason University. Her research focuses on creativity and innovation in organizations, leadership, personality, and correlation and regression. Her articles have appeared in various psychology journals of repute including Human Resources Management Review, The Industrial/Organizational Psychologist, Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Leadership Quarterly, Creativity Research Journal, Journal of Creative Behavior, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Current Psychology.

Triparna de Vreede is a PhD Student at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. She is a research associate at the Institute for Collaboration Science. She is a trained facilitator of thinkLets-based Group Support Systems workshops. Her research focuses on the psychological foundations of thinkLet-based collaboration process, cognitive processes of creativity, and creativity in groups.

Gerhard Schwabe is a Professor of Information Systems and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Economics, Business Administration, and IT at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. His research interests include creativity and collaborative technologies, IT in the financial industry, mobile technologies, and egovernment. His research has been published in ICOM, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce, and Wirtschaftsinformatik.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Triparna de Vreede (primary contact)
University of Nebraska at Omaha
E-mail:tdevreede@unomaha.edu

Roni Reiter-Palmon
University of Nebraska at Omaha
E-mail: rreiter-palmon@unomaha.edu

Gerhard Schwabe
University of Zurich
Email: schwabe@ifi.uzh.ch

 

 

Cross-Organizational and Cross-Border IS/IT Collaboration

Investments in IS/IT represent a substantial portion of corporate capital spending. With progressing globalization, many of these investments are conducted across nations and throughout regions. Cross-system integration and collaboration technologies play crucial roles and often decide about investment success or failure. Particular interest is on the linkages between global collaboration and the business value of IS/IT.Possible contributions regarding the collaboration in global economy may include, but are not limited to the following:

Nicholas C. Romano, Jr. is Associate Professor of Management Science and Information Systems, Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University. Romano earned his Ph.D. in MIS from University of Arizona and worked for IBM. His interests include: Collaborative Systems; Technology-Supported Learning; Project Management, Electronic Customer Relationship Management; Personalization and Privacy, Accessibility; and Usability and Design Evaluation. He was ranked 3rd in World in Electronic Commerce Research Journal Articles in the period from 1998-2004 in a study in the 2006 Business Research Yearbook. He has published over 30 referred articles in journals including: Journal of Management Information Systems, Communications of the ACM, International Journal of Electronic Commerce, Small Group Research, Journal of the American Society for Information Science, Group Decision and Negotiation, Information Systems Frontiers and others. Romano currently serves as a Region 1 (Americas) Representative on the Council of the Association for Information Systems (AIS) He is Associate Editor for European Journal of Information Systems, Electronic Markets and Journal of Information Systems Technology. He has Guest-edited more than 15 Special Issues of IS and related-Discipline Journals. Romano serves as a volume editor for the Advances in Management Information Systems (AMIS) and has completed a volume on CRM (with Jerry Fjermestad; NJIT) and is currently editing a volume on Collaborative Science (with Jay Nunamaker, Arizona; and Bob Briggs, Nebraska Omaha.) He is also on the editorial boards of several other IS journals and reviews for ISR, JMIS, IJEC, IJeC, MS, DSS and others. He has also long been active in the HICSS and AMCIS conferences serving as a minitrack chair, theme chair, AMCIS Reviewer Chair for 5 years and AMCIS Proceedings editor for 4 years.

James Pick is Professor in School of Business at University of Redlands, former Department Chair of Management and Business (1995-1999) and former chair of the Business School Faculty Assembly (2001-2004). He holds a B.A. from Northwestern University and Ph.D. from University of California, Irvine. He is the author of ten books and 110 journal articles, book chapters, and refereed conference papers in the research areas of management of information systems, geographic information systems, and urban studies. He has published in such journals as Communications of the AIS, Computer Personnel, Information and Management, Intl J. of Information Management, Intl J. of Technology Management, J. of Economic and Social Geography, J. of End User Computing, Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, J. of Information Technology Cases and Applications, J. of Environmental Systems, J. of Global Information Technology Management, J. of Information Technology for Development, J. of Mathematical and Computer Modeling, Simulation, and Social Science Journal. In 2001, he was a senior Fulbright scholar in Mexico and in 2005 and 2009 was visiting researcher in School of Social Science. He is faculty research associate in Center for Research in Information Technology in Organizations at University of California, Irvine.

Narcyz Roztocki is Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at the State University of New York at New Paltz and Managing Editor for the Journal of Information Science and Technology. His research interests include IS/IT investment evaluation, IS/IT productivity, IS/IT investments in emerging economies, technology project management, and E-Commerce. Dr. Roztocki received a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh and his MS degree from the Technische Universitt Hamburg-Harburg, Germany. He has published his research in journals and conferences including: the Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, International Journal of Service Technology and Management, Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on Systems Science; Proceedings of the Americas Conference on Information Systems and Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Technology Evaluation.


SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Nicholas C. Romano, Jr. (Primary Contact)
Oklahoma State University
Email: nicholas.romano@okstate.edu

James B. Pick
University of Redlands
Email: james_pick@redlands.edu

Narcyz Roztocki
State University of New York at New Paltz
Email: roztockn@newpaltz.edu

 

Designing, Deploying, and Evaluating Tools and Techniques to Support Team Collaboration

Recent data show that collaboration is a key driver for organizational performance. The impact of collaboration on organizational performance is more critical than strategic orientation or market and technological turbulence. Yet successful collaboration does not come without difficulty. Groups and teams need to overcome collaboration challenges such as groupthink, dominance, lack of efficiency and lack of focus. Successful collaboration requires support based on purposeful guidance and interventions to create groups and teams, to design and deploy processes, to design and deploy technology, to support leaders or facilitators, and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of information processing. The challenge for researchers and practitioners alike is to design sustainable processes and systems within and between organizations that allow people, groups and teams to collaborate successfully. This challenge has many dimensions, including a technical, a behavioral, a social, an emotional, an economical, and a political. This minitrack invites papers that address the design and deployment of collaboration processes and systems within and between organizations, groups, and teams and which focus on:

  1. Facilitation methods, techniques, patterns, and thinkLets to improve (a)synchronous collaboration between co-located and distributed people, teams, or groups.
  2. Design methodologies for collaborative work practices and technologies
  3. The application, and evaluation of collaboration support technologies; G(D)SS, groupware, CSCW, and meeting support technology.
  4. Collaboration Engineering and the design, codification and reuse of work practices and pattern languages for group collaboration to create self-sustaining collaboration support in organizations.
  5. Theoretical foundations and practical approaches to model and design high quality collaborative work practices.
  6. Modeling of collaborative work practices and systems.
  7. Managing collaboration engineering projects.

Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten is an Assistant Professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. She is an experienced facilitator of thinkLets-based Group Support Systems workshop having worked with numerous public and private organizations. Her research focuses on the quality of thinkLet-based collaboration process design for complex tasks. She developed the first example of Computer Supported Collaboration Engineering (CACE) technology an integrated support suite to assist collaboration engineers in process design. She has organized successful minitracks and tutorials at HICSS for the past four years. Her research has been presented at HICSS, CRIWG, AMCIS, EE and GDN conferences and has been published in the Journal of Management Information Systems, International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Journal of the AIS, and Group Decision and Negotiation.

Gert-Jan de Vreede is the Kayser Distinguished Professor at the Department of Information Systems & Quantitative Analysis at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where he is the Managing Director of the Center for Collaboration Science. He is also affiliated with the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management of Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands from where he received his PhD. His research focuses on the design of transferable practitioner-driven collaboration processes, the facilitation of group meetings, and the application, adoption, and diffusion of collaboration technology in organizations. He is co-founder of the Collaboration Engineering field and co-inventor of the thinkLets concept. His articles have appeared in various journals, including Journal of Management Information Systems, Communications of the ACM, Small Group Research, DataBase, Group Decision and Negotiation, International Journal of e-Collaboration, Group Facilitation, Journal of Creativity and Innovation Management, Journal of Decision Systems, Simulation & Gaming, Simulation, Journal of the AIS and Journal of Simulation Practice and Theory.

Robert O. Briggs is Professor in the Management and Marketing department at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where he is also the Director of Academic Affairs for the Center for Collaboration Science. He researches the theoretical foundations of collaboration and learning, and applies his findings to the design and deployment of new collaboration technologies and concepts of operation. He has published more than 100 scholarly works on team productivity, technology-supported learning, creativity, satisfaction, and technology transition. He is co-founder of the Collaboration Engineering field and co-inventor of the thinkLets concept. He lectures worldwide on collaboration theory and practice, and on the philosophy of science. He earned his doctorate Management Information Systems at the University of Arizona in 1994.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten (Primary Contact)
Delft University of Technology
Email: g.l.kolfschoten@tudelft.nl

Gert-Jan de Vreede
University of Nebraska at Omaha & Delft University of Technology
Email: gdevreede@mail.unomaha.edu

Robert O. Briggs
University of Nebraska at Omaha

Email: rbriggs@mail.unomaha.edu

 

Emerging Issues (e.g. Collaboration support in the Cloud) in Distributed Group Decision-Making: Opportunities and Challenges

Given the current turbulent state of world economy, outsourcing is coming under tremendous pressure. Companies are no longer providing long-term contracts but are renewing them based on deliverables from outsourced companies. This is putting tremendous pressure on teams to deliver quality product on time at a reasonable cost. Team adaptability and team configuration are becoming crucial to meet deadlines. Teams must be able to adapt quickly to the changing environment be it face-to-face, mobile or in the cloud. Agile teams adapt and deliver quickly and provide maximum customer satisfaction.

By definition, however, agile teams must be co-located. Can distributed teams be agile and adaptable? This requires careful team configuration. This minitrack examines the emerging issues related to team configuration and performance in distributed environment. Some research related to outsourcing of structured tasks has been done, but research related to emerging issues : diversity, cohesiveness, agility and adaptability related to group collaboration across semi or unstructured tasks & is still emerging. In addition, cloud computing is making it feasible to provide computing services at a reasonable cost. As cloud computing diffuses, decision making either individually or in a group using resources on the clouds is not far behind. Cloud computing will provide tremendous opportunities to distributed groups to make any time any place decisions at a reasonable cost. In addition, the "e (Internet)" to "m (mobile)" to "c (cloud)" transformation is creating exciting opportunities for groups to make real time decisions in a mobile possibly in the cloud environment .

Distributed teams, however, face many challenges of time, location, infrastructure, language, customs, socialization and politics. This is further compounded in globally distributed teams by diversity, nationality and cultural issues. Given the richness and research potential of this area, it is essential to brainstorm and bring diverse points of view to develop underlying theory and frameworks. This minitrack will attempt to accomplish these objectives. Since team configuration and performance includes many different areas, we expect contributions from researchers beyond information system discipline, e.g. social sciences, international management, leadership and political science.

Examples of topics in the discussion of globally distributed decision making minitrack will include the following (but are not limited to):

You may want to visit http://home.ubalt.edu/ntsbagga/hicss_45.htm for more information.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:
A. K. Aggarwal (Primary Contact)
University of Baltimore
Email: aaggarwal@ubalt.edu

Doug Vogel
City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Email: isdoug@cityu.edu.hk

Sree Nilakanta
Iowa State University
Email: nilakant@iastate.edu

 

Global Virtual Teams

Today many business processes, as well as government and scientific projects are executed by geographically dispersed virtual teams. Team members often do not have the same first language, come from different national cultures, work in different time zones and may be employed in different organizations. These differences, among others, present unique opportunities for management and leadership. This minitrack invites papers that offer insights into the successful operation of global virtual teams. Session topics include, but are not limited to:

 

Mike Hine is the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies and an Associate Professor of Information Systems in the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University located in beautiful Ottawa, Canada. His research interests include computer mediated communication and information technology service management. He has published in such journals as Journal of Management Information Systems, Communications of the ACM, Data Base, Group Decision and Negotiation, Electronic Markets, Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations among others. Prior to joining the Sprott School of Business Mike worked for many years as part of a small global virtual team that developed software to help people with disabilities make work transition decisions.

Frederick Zarndt has lived and worked in the USA, Germany, Switzerland, Libya, Argentina, India, and Israel and visited many, many other countries for business and pleasure. Both as an individual contributor and as a manager, he has more than 25 years experience in software development at companies ranging from Seismograph Service Corporation in Libya, to Siemens-Albis in Switzerland, to Novell in the USA, to an internet startup in Utah USA, and to Planman Consulting, an Indian outsourcing firm. Frederick served as Business Director and on the Board of Directors of a private, non-profit educational corporation specializing in individualized curriculum and instruction for kindergarten, elementary, and secondary students for 10 years. He holds Master of Science degrees in Computer Science and Physics.

Derrick Cogburn is Associate Professor of International Communication at the School of International Service at American University. He directs the award-winning Center for Research on Collaboratories and Technology Enhanced Learning Communities (COTELCO), a joint research center between AU and SU. COTELCO is an affiliated center of the Burton Blatt Institute, Centers of Innovation on Disability. His research investigates the social and technical factors that influence geographically distributed collaborative knowledge work, and on cross-cultural collaboration in global virtual teams in such journals as Interactions, Information Technology and International Development, IEEE Communications, Assistive Technology, Telecommunications Policy, and Network Computing. Cogburn is the past president of the Information Technology and Politics section of APSA, and past president of the International Communication section of the ISA.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Michael J. Hine (Primary contact)
Carleton University
Email: mhine@sprott.carleton.ca

Frederick Zarndt
Global Connexions
Email: frederick.zarndt@global-connexions.com

Derrick L. Cogburn
American University
Email: dcogburn@american.edu

 

 

Human-Computer Interaction: Informing Design, Utilizing Behavioral, Neurophysiological, and Design Science Methods

The aim of this mini-track is to provide a forum for HCI researchers to exchange a broad range of issues related to the design of human-computer interaction by drawing upon diverse approaches, including behavioral, neuro-physiological, and design science methods. Appropriate papers for the HCI mini-track will draw on the broadest range of research methodologies including, but not limited to, behavioral methods (e.g., case study, experimentation, survey, action research), neuro-physiological tools (e.g., fMRI, eye tracking, skin conductance response), and design science approaches. Accordingly, a broad range of reference disciplines may be appropriate to draw upon to inform design, such as: computer science, information systems, consumer behavior, psychology, organizational sciences, neuroscience, neuro-economics, and neuro-marketing. Moreover, papers that help to bridge academic research and industry practice are welcome.

Given the diverse goals of this minitrack, there are a plethora of appropriate topics; possible topics include, but are not limited to:

 B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce

 Group collaboration

 Negotiation and auction

Joseph S. Valacich is The George and Carolyn Hubman Distinguished Professor of MIS at Washington State University. His teaching interests include systems analysis and design, collaborative computing, project management, and the management of information systems. He is currently co-chairing the task force designing IS 2009 Undergraduate Model Curriculum and served on the task forces designing IS '97 and 2002 as well as MSIS 2000 and 2006: The Master of Science in Information Systems Model Curriculum. He also served on the Executive Committee, funded by NSF, to define the IS Program Accreditation Standards and on the Board of Directors for CSAB (formally, the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board), representing the Association for Information Systems (AIS). He was the general conference co-chair for the 2003 International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) in Seattle and was the vice-chair of ICIS 1999 in Charlotte, NC. His primary research interests include technology-mediated collaboration, human-computer interaction, mobile and emerging technologies, e-business, and distance education.

Angelika Dimoka, Ph.D is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Management of Information Systems (MIS) Department at the Fox school of Business at Temple University, and she is also the Director of the Center for Neural Decision Making. She holds a PhD from the Viterbi School of Engineering (specialization is in Neuroscience and Brain Imaging) with a minor from the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California.

Ryan T. Wright is an assistant professor at University of San Francisco. He holds a PhD from Washington State University in Management Information Systems. Ryan's main research interests include ecommerce interface design, online security, and research methods. He is published in the Journal of the MIS, Communications of the AIS, Group Decision and Negotiation and other peer-reviewed journals. Ryan has also presented his research at leading conferences such as the ICIS, HICSS and AMCIS. In addition to academic achievements, Ryan's professional experience includes tenure as CTO of a successful startup, time in management at Amoco Oil (now BP Amoco), consulting projects for the US Department of Commerce and expert testimony for the Attorney General's Office of Washington State.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO
Joseph S. Valacich (Primary Contact):
Washington State University
Email: jsv@wsu.edu


Angelika Dimoka
Temple University
Email: angelika@temple.edu


Ryan T. Wright
University of San Francisco
Email: rwright3@usfca.edu

 

Negotiation Support Systems

This minitrack will continue to focus on the role of NSS in a Web-centric platform and with applications in electronic markets, e-auctions and automated negotiation agents, and in social computing platforms. More particularly, we would like to look at the role of NSS to support creation of new business models and strategic formulation, and the impact of argumentation technologies in multiple-actor, text-driven platforms. We will also attempt to look into the use of NSS in some emerging applications, such as Emergency Response Systems, and the consideration of emotion in GDN.

The minitrack explores research issues related to the design, implementation, use and evaluation of negotiation support systems in business. Topics of special interest include, but are not limited to:

-  Negotiation support in electronic markets (auctions)

- Communication and argumentation systems for social networks

-  Negotiation support system, software agents and web services

- The role of NSS in media sharing and conversation building

-  Massively distributed negotiation

-  Systems to support intercultural negotiation and emotions

- Negotiation systems to support crisis management, emergency response.

- Emotion in negotiation and emotion-support.

This year there will be a stronger emphasis on the role of negotiation support in social networking and inter-organizational systems. We would encourage papers that explore the role of computer-supported argumentation, reasoning, bargaining and negotiation in Web platforms, to include:

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Tung X. Bui (Primary Contact)
Shidler College of Business / University of Hawaii at Manoa
Email: tungb@hawaii.edu

Melvin F. Shakun
Stern School of Business / New York University
Email: mshakun@stern.nyu.edu

 

Shareable Mashups, Widgets, Composites and Object Oriented GUIs Task Effectiveness and User Composing in
Collaborative Software

Modern computing can support interaction and collaboration outside the traditional paradigms of application- and task-oriented software. Past attempts at a non-application based paradigm included Smalltalk and IBM Common User Access (CUA); both presented functionality as objects to users and developers. Limits of personal computing power and market forces continued the packaging of user software as applications.

Current trends in computing allow exploring optimal organizations of software for the empowerment of diverse users. Mobile app stores provide application-centric functionality. Mashups and widgets allow creating composite displays. An object-oriented, composable user interface allows users to compose user objects in any combinations they like. Mashups, widgets, composites and OO GUIs all allow unprecedented degrees of collaboration with fine-grained control at the widget/object level.

With computing opening up to more users with varying needs, using ever increasing and diverse numbers and types of devices, what interaction and collaboration paradigms will best serve users?

Jay Trimble leads the User Centered Technology Group in the Collaborative Systems Area at NASA Ames. The group is developing a shared-object, composable, user interface technology (MCT) for NASA Mission Control. Jay previously led the Mars Rover Human Centered Computing Project. Education: M.S. Computer Science, USC; B.A. Geology, UC Berkeley.

Tom Dayton is lead user experience designer of the MCT technology at NASA Ames. Before that he designed object-oriented user interface styles at Sun, co-invented The Bridge method for designing object-oriented user interfaces at Bellcore, and worked on CUA at IBM Watson Research. He has a PhD in Experimental Psychology.

Bruce Horn develops natural-language search technologies for Microsoft's Bing.  He worked at Xerox PARC in the Smalltalk group; was on the original Macintosh development team where he created the Finder; and designed the first community-intelligence fund trading system on the Web.  He received his Ph.D. in CS from Carnegie-Mellon University.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Jay Trimble (Primary Contact)
NASA Ames Research Center
Email: Jay.p.trimble@nasa.gov

Tom Dayton
NASA Ames Research Center
Email: tdayton@acm.org

Bruce Horn
Microsoft Corp.
Email: Bruce.Horn@microsoft.com

 

 

Social Media and e-Business Transformation

Social media are online platforms that facilitate global collaboration and sharing among users. New social media applications in e-business and e-commerce appear everyday and results in enormous shocks to the ecosystem of individuals and businesses. Consumers can easily obtain information from a vast, geographically dispersed group of people in social platforms. Meanwhile, these social platforms give retailers a wealth of options for reaching potential customers, communication and collaboration, and creating values to customers. Furthermore, social media are increasingly being used in organizations to improve relationships among employees and nurture collaboration and the sharing culture.

The aim of this minitrack is to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas and best practices related to social media in e-business environments. It also aims to raise awareness in terms of the latest developments in social media, and address the challenges of using social media. This minitrack is open to all types of research, conceptual or empirical. Examples of possible topics of interest i include (but are not limited to):

Topics:

Christy M.K. Cheung is Assistant Professor at Hong Kong Baptist University. She received her Ph.D. from City University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include virtual community, knowledge management, social computing technology, and IT adoption and usage. Her research articles have been published in MIS Quarterly, Decision Support Systems, Information & Management, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, and Information Systems Frontiers. Christy received the Best Paper Award at the 2003 International Conference on Information Systems and was the PhD fellow of 2004 ICIS Doctoral Consortium.

Matthew K.O. Lee is Associate Dean (Research & Graduate Programmes) and Chair Professor of Information Systems & E-Commerce at the Faculty of Business, City University of Hong Kong. He holds a PhD degree from the University of Manchester in the UK and he is a qualified Barrister-at-Law, a Chartered Engineer (UK Engineering Council), and a professional member of the British Computer Society. Professor Lee has a research and professional interest in IT based innovation adoption and diffusion (focusing on systems implementation management issues), knowledge management, social computing, electronic commerce, and legal informatics. Professor Lee's publications in the information systems and electronic commerce areas include a book as well as over one hundred refereed articles in international journals, conference proceedings, and research textbooks. His work has appeared in leading journals such as MIS Quarterly, Journal of MIS, Communications of the ACM, and the Journal of International Business Studies. Professor Lee also serves on the editorial board of several research journals in the field.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:
Christy M.K. Cheung (Primary Contact)
Hong Kong Baptist University
Email:
ccheung@hkbu.edu.hk

Matthew K.O. Lee
City University of Hong Kong
Email: cbmatlee@cityu.edu.hk

 

 

Social Networks and Collaboration

We invite papers that explore social networks, the social graph and social influence. We are interested in empirical papers that observe or visualize social relation and social graphs; theoretical papers that simulate society through software, design research that addresses social network based software and information systems and other papers with empirical studies of social influence.

We are particularly open to papers that explore unusual ways of modelling social networks: models that demonstrate or reflect the influence of social systems on user behaviours, models that consider the multiple connections between people, technology, and institutions, models that break personal identity into sub-relations, and models that examine the emergence of roles, identity, and institutions.

With respect to content, the minitrack is open to analysis of collective intelligence web sites, new knowledge creation, collaboration, persuasive technology, analysis of social graphs, crowd-sourcing as well as ad hoc social networks formed in response to pressing social needs, e.g. in the area of health and wellbeing. Thus we are open to a wide range of content areas that lend themselves to the analysis of relations.

We are aiming to attract an audience from four groups: first, those interested in social networking who find a home in information systems departments, second, computer scientists who are interested in the analysis of networks that involve people, third, industry practitioners and forth those interested in theories and descriptions of social structure.

More generally, social network analysis and understanding of social networks is a rapidly growing field with new journal special issues and books coming out at an ever-increasing pace.

Donald Steiny is the President and Founder of the Institute for Social Network Analysis of the Economy, a member of the Silicon Valley Network Analysis Project, and an instructor at the University of California Santa Cruz. For several years he was a visiting scholar at Stanford University, and he is currently a PhD student at University of Oulu. He has over 20 years experience in software development with companies such as Hewlett-Packard and Bell Labs.

Harri Oinas-Kukkonen is Professor of information systems in the Department of Information Processing Science at the University of Oulu, Finland. His main research interests are the next generation of the web, persuasive systems design, behaviour change, and social knowledge. His research has been published in major journals. He has previously published several papers in HICSS and has participated in the conference. He has a long experience in organizing scientific workshops.

Jeffrey V. Nickerson is an Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Decision Technologies in the Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management at Stevens Institute of Technology. His research interests include social network analysis, diagram understanding, and visualization. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from New York University.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Donald Steiny (Primary contact)
University of Oulu
Email: steiny@infopoint.com

Oinas-Kukkonen Harri
University of Oulu
Email: Harri.Oinas-Kukkonen@oulu.fi

Jeffrey Nickerson
Stevens Institute of Technology
Email: jnickerson@stevens.edu

 

Social & Psychological Perspectives and Theories in Collaboration and Communication Technology Research

Our interest concerns the various social and psychological issues that surround the design, deployment, and use of collaboration and communication technologies. This minitrack will host research papers and presentations that provide a social/psychological perspective on studying issues related to the dynamic interplay between people, their environment, and the collaboration technologies they use to create collaborative value.

Examples of relevant areas and theories in psychology that fit within this minitrack's scope include, but are not limited to:

This minitrack focuses on the workings of the social, psychological, and personality factors that can affect the design, development, use, and application of collaboration and communication technologies. Thus, we seek papers that address the social and psychological perspective, concepts, and theories of collaboration and communication technologies, including social network applications Web 2.0 technologies. Of particular interest are papers that study an IS phenomenon with Psychology as a referent discipline as well as papers that study a Psychology phenomenon situated in an IS domain or application.

Specifically, we will focus on:

  1. Personality, behavioral, and social factors related to communication and collaboration in co-located and distributed groups
  2. Social and psychological effects of collaboration technologies
  3. Attractions and affiliations in groups arising from use of collaboration technologies.
  4. Team/group psychology and use of collaboration technologies.
  5. Effects and consequences of personality on system design and use.
  6. Psycho-social factors influencing acceptance and implementation of certain collaboration technologies.
  7. Leadership issues involved in collaboration
  8. Aggression and violence in online collaboration

Roni Reiter-Palmon is a Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where she is director of the Industrial/Organizational psychology program and research director of the Center for Collaboration Science. She received her PhD from George Mason University. Her research focuses on creativity and innovation in organizations, leadership, personality, and correlation and regression. Her articles have appeared in various psychology journals of repute including Human Resources Management Review, The Industrial/Organizational Psychologist, Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Leadership Quarterly, Creativity Research Journal, Journal of Creative Behavior, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Current Psychology.

Triparna de Vreede is a research associate at the Center for Collaboration Science at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where she pursues a PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. She is a trained facilitator of thinkLets-based Group Support Systems workshops. Her research focuses on creativity in groups, personality, cultural psychology, and leadership.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Triparna de Vreede (Primary Contact)
University of Nebraska at Omaha
E-mail: tdevreede@unomaha.edu

Roni Reiter-Palmon
University of Nebraska at Omaha
E-mail: rreiter-palmon@unomaha.edu

 

 

Technology Mediated Collaborations in Healthcare

Collaboration technologies are being used in healthcare research, practice, and management. They have potential for even greater use especially in the light of healthcare reforms occurring throughout many countries and greater emphasis on technology to facilitate superior healthcare delivery. Geographically dispersed health professionals can use collaboration technology to communicate with each other, review patient records, manage workflows, and improve the delivery of patient care. Similarly, geographically non-collocated researchers can collaborate with each other.

The problem being addressed by this minitrack is encapsulated in the following ontology. An earlier ontology has been updated based on the papers and discussion at previous HICSS sessions on the topic. The changes include the addition of a new partner (Agent/Bot), redefinition of the taxonomy of Content, introduction of a new dimension (Media), addition of a new Purpose (Education), and re-labeling Treatment under Purpose as Care.

 

This ontology provides a framework for fitting the pieces of the puzzle, synthesizing what is known, determining the gaps, and directing future research on the topic. We invite papers focusing any one or many of the innumerable combinations in the ontology. We welcome papers that address the state-of-the-art, state-of-the-need, and the state-of-the-practice of these combinations.

We have expanded the scope of the mini-track, as shown in the ontology, and solicit papers from a variety of researchers studying these types of collaborations.

Souren Paul is an Associate Professor of Information Systems at the department of Business at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. He holds Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Electronics and Tele-Communications Engineering from Jadavpur University, India, and a PhD in Management Information Systems from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. He has published research articles in Journal of Management Information Systems, Decision Support Systems, Information & Management, and Proceedings of Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. His current research interests are in the areas of collaboration systems, knowledge management systems, virtual teams, and information technology applications in healthcare.

Arkalgud Ramaprasad is a Professor in the Department of Information and Decision Sciences (IDS) in the College of Business Administration. From 2000-2006 he was the Head of IDS at UIC and the Director of the Center for Research in Information Management (CRIM) there. Earlier, from 1989-2000, he was the founding Director of the Pontikes Center for Management of Information. His research topics include enterprise eHealth strategy, digital divide in eHealth applications, managing medical knowledge using the internet, patient-physician relationship in the information age, knowledge supply networks, and knowledge management. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1980; MBA from the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, India, 1972; and B.E. (Electrical), from the University of Mysore, Karnataka, India, 1970.

Nilmini Wickramasinghe has an internationally recognized research record in the area of healthcare and technology management. As of 13th Dec 2009 she was appointed professor of information management and library science in the school of Business IT and Logistics at RMIT University, Australia. Prior to this she was an associate professor and the associate director for the Centre for the Management of Medical Technology at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago USA. Dr Wickramasinghe currently has over 200 peer-reviewed scholarly journal publications and is the author of several books and an Encyclopedia in Healthcare and Technology. Dr Wickramasinghe is the Editor-in-Chief of two scholarly international peer-reviewed scholarly journals published by InderScience and the Springer Series Editor for Healthcare delivery in the Information Age.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Souren Paul (Primary Contact)
City University of New York
Email: paul@mail.csi.cuny.edu

Arkalgud Ramaprasad
University of Illinois at Chicago
Email: prasad@uic.edu

Nilmini Wickramasinghe
RMIT University
Email: nilmini.wickramasinghe@rmit.edu.au

 

 

Work and Play in Virtual Worlds

Virtual worlds provide a visual window to a persistent and synthetic world inhabited by avatars that are deeply involved in social interactions, along with economic and commercial activities. They are immersive by nature and reinvent the notions of "being together" and awareness for distributed teams. Virtual worlds and metaverses present challenges and opportunities for individuals and groups working, playing and learning together: challenges as groups using virtual worlds have to overcome limitations originating from not sharing the same physical space and opportunities as virtual worlds offer possibilities that are impossible in the real world.

To address these challenges and opportunities, this minitrack invites theoretical and empirical research that investigates how individuals and teams within and between organizations use virtual worlds and metaverses to coordinate tasks, share information, simulate processes, solve problems, make decisions, create and manipulate objects, innovate, play, learn, and create value. papers should focus on:

  1. Theoretical foundations and practical approaches to understand, model, and design virtual worlds and metaverses.
  2. The use of virtual worlds to learn, to collaborate, to recreate, and to innovate, and to co-create organizational and individual value.
  3. The impact of virtual world characteristics on individual and team behavior.
  4. Methods, techniques, patterns, and best practices to support productive (a)synchronous collaboration, communication, and coordination between individuals and groups using virtual worlds.
  5. The design, application, and evaluation of virtual world environments and applications.

Gert-Jan de Vreede is the Frederic W. Kayser Distinguished Professor at the Department of Information Systems & Quantitative Analysis at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where he the Managing Director of the Center for Collaboration Science. He is also affiliated with the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management of Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands from where he received his PhD. His research focuses on the design of transferable practitioner-driven collaboration processes, the facilitation of group meetings, and the application, adoption, and diffusion of collaboration technology in organizations. He is co-founder of the Collaboration Engineering field and co-inventor of the thinkLets concept. His articles have appeared in various journals, including Journal of Management Information Systems, Communications of the ACM, Small Group Research, DataBase, Group Decision and Negotiation, International Journal of e-Collaboration, Group Facilitation, Journal of Creativity and Innovation Management, Journal of Decision Systems, Simulation & Gaming, Simulation, and Journal of Simulation Practice and Theory. Since 1996, he has organized over 30 minitracks at HICSS.

Moez Limayem is the Walton Professor and Chair of the Information Systems Department at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas. He holds an MBA and a Ph.D. in Management Information Systems from the University of Minnesota. His current research interests include IT adoption and usage in Education, Customer Relationship Management, Knowledge Management and Social Virtual Worlds. He has had several articles published or forthcoming in many journals such as MIS Quarterly, Management Science, Information Systems Research, Communications of the ACM, Journal of AIS, IEEE Transactions, Accounting, Management & Information technologies, Group Decision and Negotiation, and Small Group Research. Dr. Limayem is or was on the editorial board of several important journals such MIS Quarterly, Information and Management and SIM. He won the best MIS paper award at the ASAC conference in 1998 and at the ICIS conference in 2003. Dr. Limayem is the past president of the Association of Information and Management. He was also the program co-chair for ICIS 2008 and the chair of the AIM 2007 conference. Dr. Limayem is the current co-chair of the AIS Senior Scholars Consortium.

Imed Boughzala is Associate Professor at the Department of Information Systems at the Business School of the TELECOM Institute in Paris, France. He received a PhD in Computer Information Systems from the University of Paris VI Pierre & Marie Curie. His research's interests are related to e-collaboration and Knowledge Management. As part of his research, he is working with several French and International companies as an expert in Knowledge Mapping and Modeling techniques, and in collaboration technologies and virtual project management. He is former executive vice-president of the French Knowledge Management Club, a CKMO professional association. During the last years, he has been experimenting with Virtual Learning through 3D Virtual Worlds such as Second Life. Imed Boughzala is author of several articles and books on Knowledge Management, e-Government and Collaboration. In 2007, he has published a book (in French) on "Collaboration Engineering: theories, technologies and practices" with Hermes Science Publishing. He is associate editor of Information & Management. In 2008 and 2009, he was visiting Professor at three universities for three successive semesters: Brunel West London University (United Kingdom), University of Arkansas and University of Nebraska at Omaha.

SUBMIT INQUIRIES TO:

Gert-Jan de Vreede (primary contact)
University of Nebraska at Omaha & Delft University of Technology
Email: gdevreede@unomaha.edu

Moez Limayem
University of Arkansas
Email: MLimayem@walton.uark.edu

Imed Boughzala
Institut TELECOM
Email: imed.boughzala@it-sudparis.eu